The First Gospel (LODLIB v1.42 release notes)

This week’s edition releases a major update to the internal Data Dictionary to include a Discourse Analysis and Rhetorical Techniques section (DD 1.3) that builds on the work of Stephen H. Levinsohn for the BART (Biblical Analysis and Research Tool) project. Initial findings from my comparison of Discourse Analysis features in GMarc and canonical Luke, along with cumulative findings from the other sections, have now brought our list of distinctive vocal features demonstrating Statistically Significant Variance between Lk1 and Lk2 to over a hundred. I have thus strengthened our proofs for the Schwegler hypothesis that GMarc is an earlier version of Luke with over a thousand different data points. Essentially, I’ve now scientifically clarified the distinct voice of the editor of canonical Luke in contrast to its sources for the first time in history.

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The First Gospel (LODLIB v1.41 release notes)

This week’s edition has incremental improvements over the last addition, some new additions to the Comparative Restoration and Data Dictionary, and spelling and grammatical corrections throughout. Finalizing my forthcoming co-authored Harvard Theological Review article on Iphigenia, Librarian duties and home responsibilities have all made work on the First Gospel book slower going than usual, but I’m hoping to get back in the groove of uploading an updated edition each week.

On a related, very positive note, I recently received complementary review copies of Matthias Klinghardt’s freshly published two volume work: The Oldest Gospel (Leuven: Peeters, 2021), which I’m reviewing for the Brill journal Vigiliae Christianae. Thank you to Peeters and to the editor(s) at Brill for this opportunity.

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First and Third Gospel Reconstruction v1.21 Uploaded

Continuing to make great progress. Now up to 383 pages and over 116,000 words. A few notable changes in this version and/or the last couple versions:

  • new subsection: “Comprehensive Analysis of the Synoptic Receptions of the Markan Source” (this should convince many scholars about my two-source hypothesis for the Gospel of Marcion, as should the next one)
  • new subsection: “Lukan Redactional Features Disproportionately Missing from GMarc”
  • developed new abbreviations for signals tagging (one dot, two dots, three dots rather than 1, 2, 3) and Gospels (Lk1, Mt1, Mt2, etc.)
  • tagging and parallel set reconstructions up through GMarc chapter 8 now complete
  • starting to split out Late Mark (140s) and Late Matthew (140s) redactions into separate columns, a significant data visualization improvement
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Summary Highlights of the Newly Discovered First Gospel (Qn, 66-69)

Thought it would be a nice courtesy to readers to distill down some of the highlights from Qn, the very First Gospel out of the Jesus movement, a text that I discovered and announced a few weeks ago and am busy proving and reconstructing each day. A partial preliminary edition and translation has now been released for public viewing. While I have called this text Qn or the Gospel of the Poor, we might also consider calling it the Gospel of the Enslaved Messiah, the Slave Gospel, the Abolitionist Gospel, or the Gospel of Liberation.

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Theorem of Three-Way Signaling: The Key to Charting the Historical Strata of the Gospels

[Revised July 10]

A big part of the challenge we face, especially in the study of Gospel texts, is that:

1) the main content does not offer clear, external historical references as to time of composition and/or editing (very unscientific of them, not to date and time stamp and version control their work!); and

2) manuscripts tend to fabricate and improvise anachronistic historical references, such as putting the names of legendary leaders, “Mark,” “Matthew,” “Luke,” “John,” “Peter,” etc., at the beginning (incipits) of texts within manuscripts.

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