First and Third Gospel v1.22 uploaded

Finished reconstructions and tagging of Early Luke / Gospel of Marcion through most of chapter 9. I’ve also improved numerous prior passages by breaking out more of Late Mark (Mk2, 140s CE) and Late Matthew (Mt2, 140s CE), as well as splitting up the Johannine strata (e.g., Jn1, 100-110; Jn2, 110-117). This scientific signals synthesis and triangulation method actually works! My fresh analysis is confirming much of what Vinzent, Klinghardt, Knox, Tyson and others have found about the Gospel of Marcion and its relationship to the synoptic Gospels.

Read More »

First Gospel LODLIB v1.18 now uploaded

Available at the usual spot: https://doi.org/10.5281/zenodo.3927056

Lots of fresh signals analysis and textual reconstructions of content of the First Gospel and the Third Gospel (Early Luke or the Gospel of Marcion) from chapters 6-8, 11, and 13 now available in the latest version (1.18). Readers/scholars/fans: always be encouraged to download and read the latest edition, since substantive additions are now being made and self-archived on a weekly basis.

Also of note: I’ve removed the access restriction on version 1 of the book on Zenodo, so everyone can now see what this book proposal and five hypotheses looked like when it was first uploaded on July 1, 2020. From 50 pages to 350 pages in six weeks is pretty good progress!

Read More »

Encore une fois, les deux éditions du Luc

A couple close scholarly friends have recently provided private critical feedback about my reconstruction of the Gospel of Marcion and the First Gospel (Qn). Generally, their response simply repeated the common, traditional position: there was only one version of Luke, and the Gospel of Marcion is a later abridgement of that. I’d rather not have to tell friends that they are wrong, but friends, you are wrong. Please allow me to explain why, even without drawing at all on my scientific method and approach to signals synthesis and triangulation.

Read More »

Summary Highlights of the Newly Reconstructed Third Gospel (GMarc, 80s CE)

Again, as a courtesy to readers, I distill down the highlights from my findings about the Gospel of Marcion (GMarc), the third major Gospel compilation created and popularized in the Jesus tradition. Building on the initial 135 page elaboration of my ten Socratic assumptions and five theses about the Gospel of Marcion, followed by 225 pages of proofs of my five scientifically testable hypotheses, I am continuing to reconstruct the text of GMarc and Qn (the First Gospel) carefully each day.

Read More »

Gospel of Marcion WAS NOT based on Canonical Luke, so say the Distinctive Matthean Traditions

With every passing day I apply scientific signals analysis triangulation techniques to study the Gospel parallels, the more patently obvious it becomes that Gospel of Marcion was a much earlier text that Late Luke (or what some scholars anachronistically call “canonical Luke”). Sure, there are lots of parallels between Gospel of Marcion and Late Luke. But why is it that Gospel of Marcion is usually missing distinctive Markan traditions and is almost always missing distinctive Matthean traditions that Late Luke incorporated?

Read More »

If only Harnack had

Time’s contingency is a real b****, isn’t it.

Adolf von Harnack was happily following F. C. Baur’s lead in moving Luke and Acts to the middle of the second century.

Harnack, simply because Acts ends in an unresolved fashion with Paul in prison, went from Baur’s position to put Luke and Acts in the 60s.

Read More »

CANT 78.3, Hospitality and Perfume of the Bandit: Critical Edition in Progress

Always enjoyable to come back to paleography. Today’s task is to finish my critical edition of CANT 78.3, The Hospitality and Perfume of the Bandit, based on a collation of texts found in two manuscripts, Vatican Library Lat. 6300 and British Library Harley 3199. The story is likely 13th or 14th century, one among several medieval variations of the Good Thief’s hospitality to the Holy Family during their sojourn to Egypt.

This story is unique in that it ties the miraculous perfume the Good Thief receives from Jesus’ mother Mary to the alabaster-carried perfume that Mary Magdalene used to anoint the feet of Jesus.

Read More »

Self-Archived Open Access Publications Uploaded and ORCID Updated

After obtaining or checking for permission with my publishers, I’ve uploaded open access versions of many of my recent publications. All of these self-archived publications now have DOIs and are linked in my ORCID record. This was also a good reminder to update my ORCID record more generally, so I added all of my missing presentations and service work. I’m almost up to 100 academic works!

Read More »