Erastus as Timothy’s Lover? A Possibly Positive Homoerotic Allusion in Acts 19.22 in Light of the Orestes-Pylades Mythological Paradigm of Friendship

A quick follow-up to the previous post. As part of our forthcoming article in Harvard Theological Review, there is a footnote (p26n68 in the Green Open Access archived version) that should be surfaced and not buried.

The Greek word ἐραστής means “lover,” “admirer,” or “adherent.” See LSJ s.v. ἐραστής. In antiquity, the love between Orestes and Pylades was commonly seen as more than platonic friendship. See, e.g., Lucian, Erotes 47 and Augustine, Confessions 4.6, both quoted in Hall, Adventures with Iphigenia, 107–108. Given the etymology of the name and its intertextual indebtedness, Erastus and his pairing with Timothy may suggest an homoerotic interpretation. Regarding the paradigmatic status of the friendship of Orestes and Pylades, see esp. Lucian, Toxaris.

Harvard Theological Review article forthcoming: Iphigenia-Orestes Myths Retold in the Canonical Acts of the Apostles [updated 2021-04-16]

A forthcoming article by me and Anna Lefteratou in Harvard Theological Review explores how the Ephesian Riots in Acts 19 are thoroughly modeled after Euripides’ Iphigenia in Tauris in matters of vocabulary, plot, themes, characterization, dramatic sequencing, and speech acts.

Update 2021-04-16. Got confirmation of final acceptance today! Screenshot below. Additionally, Anna and I recently heard that the article will be cited in a major forthcoming commentary on Iphigenia in Tauris as part of the section on the reception of the play. Green OA archiving makes a difference! As per usual, in the publishing negotiation process I’m trying my best to advocate for the version of record being made fully open access without the payment of an APC. Since HTR is a hybrid OA journal and the authors’ institutions already pay Cambridge University Press a lot in subscriptions, this is an eminently reasonable ask. I’ll report back on their decision once I hear.

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Self-Archived Open Access Publications Uploaded and ORCID Updated

After obtaining or checking for permission with my publishers, I’ve uploaded open access versions of many of my recent publications. All of these self-archived publications now have DOIs and are linked in my ORCID record. This was also a good reminder to update my ORCID record more generally, so I added all of my missing presentations and service work. I’m almost up to 100 academic works!

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Classical Greek Models of the Gospels and Acts: Chapter Summaries

The first six chapters look with critical appreciation on MacDonald’s recent work, support mimesis criticism becoming a vital and standard methodology within New Testament studies, and sometimes propose new directions of mimetic inquiry. The final three chapters focus on close mimetic analysis of specific passages in the Gospels and Acts, while also tracing out broader literary and theological implications for the New Testament, early Christianity, and the reception of epic literature in late antiquity.

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“The First Dionysian Gospel: Imitational and Redactional Layers in Luke and John”: Extended Summary

This chapter in my recently published Classical Greek Models of the Gospels and Acts proposes a novel solution to the synoptic problem. Noting the gradual expansion of classical/mimetic sources over time, as well as the key role of Marcion’s Gospel and Pliny the Younger’s correspondence as pioneering legal precedent, I summarize the history and interrelationships of the canonical Gospels as follows:

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International SBL Papers

Thanks to the generosity of CST, I am getting the chance to travel to Seoul, Korea, this July to attend the International Society of Biblical Literature meeting. Dennis MacDonald was kind enough to invite me to be on a panel reviewing his new book on the Gospel of John and Euripides. I also submitted a couple of paper proposals which were accepted.

For the Digital Humanities section, I am presenting a paper entitled, “A Digital Rebirth in Christian Apocrypha Studies: NASSCAL and the eClavis.” Abstract:

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