The First Gospel (LODLIB v1.35 release notes)

This week’s edition puts us at almost 680 pages and over 280,000 words. Major highlights:

  • A new section on the history of scholarship on Computational Linguistics and the Synoptic Problem. Ever wonder why we couldn’t solve the Synoptic Problem before? Faulty understanding and modeling of the problem and only using a fraction of the relevant datasets!
  • New additions and numerous corrections to our statistical proofs. What happens when you bring together statistics about GMarc’s abundance of triple tradition passages with statistics about its lack of Markan and Lukan passages? Hint: if this were judo or MMA, this would be the submission hold that ends the match against defenders of the early orthodox hypothesis that GMarc is derived from Luke.
  • A new Lk2 clean vocal stratum training dataset for Natural Language Processing and Computational Linguistics. Ever wonder what the redactor of Late Luke (Lk2) unfiltered without synoptic noise sounds like? Any of the coders out there eager to have lemmatized and morphologically tagged datasets to test our hypotheses? Here ya go!
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First and Third Gospel Discovery: Christmas Edition (v1.32)

This evening’s edition brings us to 580 pages of detailed and ever-growing evidence proving my five hypotheses to uncover and reconstruct the first and third gospel strata. Besides reorganizing the table of contents and chapter order to be cleaner, we’ve added lots of new content:

  • an in-book Dataset and Code Repository section, which debuts here with a digital edition of Harnack’s critical reconstruction of Marcion’s Gospel
  • lots of footnotes on the history of scholarship of Marcion’s Gospel
  • a new section, “Half of a Love Letter to Advocates of the Marcionite Hypothesis”
  • a new excursus calling for a new Quest for the Historical Marcion and critiquing the failure of scholars to set Marcion squarely and thoroughly within his Roman historical setting, almost entirely ignoring the major role that Pliny the Younger (the first Roman official on record to execute Christians) probably played in Marcion’s life and thinking as his local governor in Pontus

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Data Dictionary upgrades and integrations in First Gospel v1.31

We’ve now reached 550 pages and 250,000 words, up from 530 pages and 225,000 words in the last version.

We’ve also reclassified the “Linguistic-Syntactical Vocal Strata Profiles” as an embedded Data Dictionary with distinct headings that are now increasingly cross-referenced from footnotes. Hundreds of new entries are included; many of these entries add significant further evidence clarifying the distinct voices (vocal strata) of Qn, Lk1 and Lk2 within Luke.

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Statistical Proofs of GMarc as Early Luke from the Single, Double, and Triple Traditions

Today we release v1.30, containing new statistical proofs related to my discovery of the First Gospel (Qn) as an actual, historical text whose vocal stratum data can be proven and restored using modern data science methods. This goes together with my scientific reconstruction of Marcion’s Gospel as the third gospel stratum. We are now at 530 pages and almost 225,000 words, up from 500 pages and 210,000 words in our last version.

The main set of new proofs is the “Statistical Analysis of GMarc and Single, Double, and Triple Traditions.” By carefully comparing attestations and word counts of these different tradition types in GMarc and Lk2, we show clearly that GMarc has a consistent, systematic lack of single traditions compared to double and especially triple traditions. These patterns are too consistently evident across an inconsistently attested text to be explained logically as the product of Marcion’s editorial work or of random or even deliberate patterns of early orthodox attestation or suppression. The only scientifically sound explanation of the consistent favoring of double and triple traditions to single traditions in GMarc that Lk2 was a revised and expanded version of GMarc. The payoff of this detailed analysis comes in the following tables:

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