e-Clavis Entry on the Narrative of Joseph of Arimathea (CANT 76; ECCA 274)

The entry is completed and now posted on the e-Clavis site. Thank you: to Stephen Hopkins (the section editor) for persistently and patiently nudging me to finish this entry; to Bradley Rice for insightful correspondence about the relationship of the Greek Narrative of Joseph of Arimathea to the distinctive Georgian Story of Joseph of Arimathea (the seminal story in Holy Grail lore); to Tony Burke for editorial skill and rigor that always makes my writing far better than what I submitted; and to Slavomír Čéplö for your expertise and assistance with the Slavic manuscripts and related literature on this text. Teamwork makes the dream work!

Now back to work on the Brill Encyclopedia of Early Christianity article on this fascinating text, where I get to dig into the historical and literary contexts! In my analysis, its portrayal of Demas (aka Dismas or Dysmas) is highly significant in the history of the cult of the so-called Good Thief.

Incidentally, NASSCAL already tweeted about this new entry…

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CANT 78.3, Hospitality and Perfume of the Bandit: Critical Edition in Progress

Always enjoyable to come back to paleography. Today’s task is to finish my critical edition of CANT 78.3, The Hospitality and Perfume of the Bandit, based on a collation of texts found in two manuscripts, Vatican Library Lat. 6300 and British Library Harley 3199. The story is likely 13th or 14th century, one among several medieval variations of the Good Thief’s hospitality to the Holy Family during their sojourn to Egypt.

This story is unique in that it ties the miraculous perfume the Good Thief receives from Jesus’ mother Mary to the alabaster-carried perfume that Mary Magdalene used to anoint the feet of Jesus.

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